CCTV Evidence Retrieval

CCTV Evidence Retrieval
CCTV has become an ever more widespread weapon against crime; its very presence is a deterrent to people who are looking for opportunity, opportunity with a criminal motive. Often petty criminals will simply go elsewhere if they think there is video surveillance. That is not always the case of course and the provision of CCTV evidence in identifying a crime and finding a culprit has become an important tool for police and the judicial system.

CCTV Aware provides support and assistance to all parties in the evidence handling and examination of CCTV and digital media. We inspect , analyse and investigate recording equipment, files and data, both video and audio, involved in civil and criminal legal matters. Fraud, insurance claims, surveillance, criminal damage, break-in, burglary, dispute, trespass etc., and all matters where CCTV camera recordings are involved and require investigation and formal report presentation.

We are a leading company in the field of digital and computer forensics with fully equipped secure workshops and facilities. Our experienced technicians and analysts retrieve files from multiplexed CCTV recording equipment using forensic procedures.

Need Assistance CALL: 0800 772 0822

Digital Forensic Service Experience.
Having acted for law enforcement, Police and in civil disputes our technicians are able to prepare evidence, witness statements and reports.

CCTV Systems Retrieval Specialists.
CCTV Aware technicians are particularly skilled in dealing with equipment and hard disk drives (HDD’s) that have suffered, corruption, damage, deletion and misuse. Typically fire, water damaged, misused, maltreated equipment, inaccessible or deleted data files.

CCTV Forensic Investigation Guidelines.
If you are considering using our services or require immediate assistance the following general background information concerning the management of CCTV data may be of assistance:

Requests to view files generated by a CCTV system are likely to be made for any one or more of the following purposes:

  • as evidence in criminal proceedings
  • as evidence in civil proceedings or tribunals
  • crime prevention
  • detection of crime (may include id of offenders)
  • identification of witnesses.

Third parties, which are required to show adequate grounds for disclosure of data within the above criteria, may include, but are not limited to:

  • police
  • statutory authorities with powers to prosecute, (eg. Customs, Trading Standards, etc)
  • solicitors
  • claimants in civil proceedings
  • Accused persons or defendants in criminal proceedings
  • other agencies, according to purpose and legal status.

Upon receipt from a third party of a bona fide request for the release of data, the data controller shall:

  • not unduly obstruct a third party investigation to verify the existence of relevant data.
  • ensure the retention of data which may be relevant to a request, but which may be pending application for, or the issue of, a court order or subpoena. A time limit shall be imposed on such retention, which will be notified at the time of the request.

Where requests fall outside the terms of disclosure and Subject Access legislation, the data controller, or nominated representative, shall:

  • be satisfied that there is no connection with any existing data held by the police in connection with the same investigation.
  • treat all such enquiries with strict confidentiality.

Secondary Request.
A ‘secondary’ request for access to data may be defined as any request being made which does not fall into the category of a primary request.

Before complying with a secondary request, the data controller shall ensure that:

  • the request does not contravene, and that compliance with the request would not breach, current relevant legislation, (eg. Data Protection Act 1998, Human Rights Act 1998, section 163 Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994, etc);
  • any legislative requirements have been complied with, (e.g. the requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998);
  • due regard has been taken of any known case law (current or past) which may be relevant.
  • the request would pass a test of ‘disclosure in the public interest’.

If, in compliance with a secondary request to view data, a decision is taken to release material to a third party, the following safeguards shall be put in place before surrendering the material:

In respect of material to be released under the auspices of ‘crime prevention’, written agreement to the release of the material should be obtained from a police officer, not below the rank of Inspector. The officer should have personal knowledge of the circumstances of the crime/s to be prevented and an understanding of the CCTV System Code of Practice.

if the material is to be released under the auspices of ‘public well being, health or safety’, written agreement to the release of material should be obtained from a senior officer within the Local Authority. The officer should have personal knowledge of the potential benefit to be derived from releasing the material and an understanding of the CCTV System Code of Practice.

Recorded material may be used for bona fide training purposes such as police or staff training. Under no circumstances will recorded material be released for commercial sale of material for training or entertainment purposes.

Data Protection.
Under the terms of Data Protection legislation, individual access to personal data, of which that individual is the data subject, must be permitted providing:

  • the request is made in writing;
  • a specified fee is paid for each individual search;
  • the data controller is supplied with sufficient information to satisfy him or her self as to the identity of the person making the request;
  • the person making the request provides sufficient and accurate information about the time, date and place to enable the data controller to locate the information which that person seeks, (it is recognised that a person making a request is unlikely to know the precise time. Under those circumstances it is suggested that within one hour of accuracy would be a reasonable requirement);

the person making the request is only shown information relevant to that particular search and which contains personal data of her or him only, unless all other individuals who may be identified from the same information have consented to the disclosure.

In the event of the data controller complying with a request to supply a copy of the data to the subject, only data pertaining to the individual should be copied, (all other personal data which may facilitate the identification of any other person should be concealed or erased). Under these circumstances an additional fee may be payable.

The data controller is entitled to refuse an individual request to view data under these provisions if insufficient or inaccurate information is provided, however every effort should be made to comply with subject access procedures and each request should be treated on its own merit. In addition to the principles contained within the Data Protection legislation, the data controller should be satisfied that the data is:

  • not currently and, as far as can be reasonably ascertained, not likely to become, part of a ‘live’ criminal investigation;
  • not currently and, as far as can be reasonably ascertained, not likely to become, relevant to civil proceedings;
  • not the subject of a complaint or dispute which has not been actioned;
  • the original data and that the audit trail has been maintained;
  • not removed or copied without proper authority;
  • for individual disclosure only (i.e. to be disclosed to a named subject).

Disclosure Process.
The data controller his agents or assigns must first of all verify the accuracy of the request. Replay the data to the party that has requested to view the files only, (or responsible person acting on behalf of the person making the request).

The viewing should take place in a separate room and not in the control or monitoring area. Only data which is specific to the search request shall be shown.

It must not be possible to identify any other individual from the information being shown, (any such information will be blanked-out, either by means of electronic screening or manual editing on the monitor screen). If a copy of the material is requested and there is no on-site means of editing out other personal data, then the material shall be sent to an editing house for processing prior to being viewed.

If having considered all the aspects mentioned above and now require assistance or advice, then please contact our help line.

  • police
  • statutory authorities with powers to prosecute, (eg. Customs, Trading Standards, etc)
  • solicitors
  • claimants in civil proceedings
  • accused persons or defendants in criminal proceedings
  • other agencies, (as agreed by the Data Controller and notified to the Information Commissioner) according to purpose and legal status.

Upon receipt from a third party of a bona fide request for the release of data, the data controller shall:

  • not unduly obstruct a third party investigation to verify the existence of relevant data.
  • ensure the retention of data which may be relevant to a request, but which may be pending application for, or the issue of, a court order or subpoena. A time limit shall be imposed on such retention, which will be notified at the time of the request.

Where requests fall outside the terms of disclosure and Subject Access legislation, the data controller, or nominated representative, shall:

  • be satisfied that there is no connection with any existing data held by the police in connection with the same investigation.
  • treat all such enquiries with strict confidentiality.